1920 vs 2020: What Has Changed and What Has Remained and What These Six Women Are Doing About It

1920 vs 2020: What Has Changed and What Has Remained and What These Six Women Are Doing About It

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which granted women the right to vote. However, what is too often omitted from the retelling of such a celebrated milestone is that women of color had to wait over 20 years to have access to the same civic right. Native American women had to wait until 1947, Asian American women until 1952, and Black women waited until, obviously, the Civil Rights Movement in 1965. Yet, after all that strife to achieve equal voting rights, voter suppression is still very much prevalent in 2020, with the current conditions under the pandemic further disenfranchising communities of color from voting.

 

A group of six women–who are all connected through one of the world’s most prestigious women’s colleges, Barnard–independently organized a virtual reunion. The event gathered nearly 150 alumnae and friends to do what our beloved feminist legends like Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Gloria Steinem, Dolores Huerta, Florynce Rae Kennedy, and Wilma M...

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